Charlotte Potato

Charlotte (Organic Salad/Second early Variety)

£3.99

Out of stock

A classic salad potato
This salad potato is high yielding with long, yellow tubers and waxy, tasty flesh. It will provide you with an excellent crop of delicious salad-sized potatoes that will store well. This variety has good blight resistance.

Number of tubers (seed potatoes): 10

Variety: Charlotte (organic)

Can be grown in: Potatoes need a bit of depth. You can grow them straight in the ground in a raised bed, or in a deep planter. Find out more about growing potatoes in our growing guide below.

In the kitchen: This variety of potato is suitable for boiling, mashing, steamed or sautéed.

Can be delivered from: February onwards.

The right site

You want well dug soil that is moisture retentive in a nice open position. Potatoes also prefer slightly acidic soil.

Can be grown in....

Potatoes need a bit of depth. You can grow them straight in the ground in a raised bed, or in a deep planter. We’ve known Rocketeers to grow their spuds in a stack of old tyres or even in an old wheelbarrow.

How far apart?

Earlies: about 30cm (12in) apart with 40-50cm (16-20in) between the rows

Second earlies and maincrops: about 38cm (15in) apart with 75cm (30in) between the rows.

Looking after your plants....

You’l get loads more from your potato crop by following the tips below:


potatoes

If planting straight into the ground...

If planting straight into the ground,  you’ll need to dig a trench approximately 15cm deep, and place your potatoes into the trench and then cover with soil.

potatoes

If planting in containers...

If planting in containers, choose one that’s at least 30cm deep and wide. Half fill the container with multi-purpose compost or good quality, fertile garden soil. Place two seed potatoes on top of the compost and cover with another 10cm of compost.

potatoes

Earth them up

As the shoots appear, earth up each plant by covering it with a layer of soil so that the shoots are just buried. Continue to do this at regular intervals and by the end of the season each plant will have a small mound around it about 15cm (6in) high. (This is done to prevent light getting to the potatoes, which would turn them green. It’s also good for keeping weeds down!)

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Watering them

Potatoes are binge drinkers! So, water them well as soon as you plant them and after that, give them a thorough watering occasionally during dry spells to keep them happy.

Storage Tips

Earlies won’t keep very long – you’re best to dig ‘em up as you want them. The best way to keep maincrop potatoes is in a paper sack, or hessian, in a dark, cool place. They’ll keep for a good few weeks like that.

Ways to cook

The key to cooking potatoes is choosing the right variety for the right method of cooking…floury potatoes lend themselves to roasting and mashing.